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Nick Webber

About Nick Webber

Nick Webber's background

Nick Webber's role at STEAMHOUSE

Nick Webber on collaboration

Nick Webber's STEAMhouse goals

The STEAMlabs challenge

Nick Webber's essential items

A fact about Nick Webber

Nick Webber's ideal STEAMlabs delegate

I work at Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research, focusing on video games, history and creative industries/cultural policy. I also have a research leadership role around games within our Faculty of Arts, Design and Media. Games have always been an important part of my life, and I’m keen to understand how we can help the games industry to grow, both in our region and beyond.

I hold a PhD in Medieval History from the University of Birmingham, but moved into games-related research around a decade ago. In between, I held a variety of managerial, technical and administrative positions, including development and funding roles both at BCU and UoB.

I was research lead on the 2015 Gaming Global report, which successfully made the case that the British Council should include games within their Arts Programme. Along with other BCU colleagues, I was also part of the Nesta-funded Culture Cloud project, working with New Art Exchange (Nottingham) and Artfinder (London). Most recently, I was involved in the AHRC-funded Generations of Commemoration: Re-presenting the Legacy of the Great War, a project in partnership with Secret City Arts (Birmingham) which explored the use of archive film in participatory creative arts work. The project was part of the Voices of War and Peace Engagement Centre, and you can find the toolkit we created here.

I co-lead Games@STEAMhouse, which focuses on supporting companies that make games, and companies that want to draw on ideas from games to make their processes and products better. My role is strategic, connecting this work with other activity in the university and the region, and working with companies interested in research collaborations or in the funding landscape. I contribute to the support we provide through my knowledge of (public) funding and policy around games and the games industry.

Working with others has always been at the heart of our research centre ethos, and I come to STEAMhouse with that mindset. Collaboration forces you to reflect on your established ways of working, to break bad habits and share good ones. In my experience, it can improve the quality of your research, add nuance to projects, and prompt new approaches to problems.

To work with a range of people from across our target industries in order to better understand how our regional creative economy functions, and to offer research-informed support for the games industry.

How can advanced manufacturing increase engagement with arts and culture?

Books. Cats. Tea.

I can play the French Horn. I don’t (any more), but I can.

Anyone with some skills and some good ideas, eager to listen to and work with others, and willing to share power.

About Nick Webber

I work at Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research, focusing on video games, history and creative industries/cultural policy. I also have a research leadership role around games within our Faculty of Arts, Design and Media. Games have always been an important part of my life, and I’m keen to understand how we can help the games industry to grow, both in our region and beyond.

Nick Webber's background

I hold a PhD in Medieval History from the University of Birmingham, but moved into games-related research around a decade ago. In between, I held a variety of managerial, technical and administrative positions, including development and funding roles both at BCU and UoB.

I was research lead on the 2015 Gaming Global report, which successfully made the case that the British Council should include games within their Arts Programme. Along with other BCU colleagues, I was also part of the Nesta-funded Culture Cloud project, working with New Art Exchange (Nottingham) and Artfinder (London). Most recently, I was involved in the AHRC-funded Generations of Commemoration: Re-presenting the Legacy of the Great War, a project in partnership with Secret City Arts (Birmingham) which explored the use of archive film in participatory creative arts work. The project was part of the Voices of War and Peace Engagement Centre, and you can find the toolkit we created here.

Nick Webber's role at STEAMHOUSE

I co-lead Games@STEAMhouse, which focuses on supporting companies that make games, and companies that want to draw on ideas from games to make their processes and products better. My role is strategic, connecting this work with other activity in the university and the region, and working with companies interested in research collaborations or in the funding landscape. I contribute to the support we provide through my knowledge of (public) funding and policy around games and the games industry.

Nick Webber on collaboration

Working with others has always been at the heart of our research centre ethos, and I come to STEAMhouse with that mindset. Collaboration forces you to reflect on your established ways of working, to break bad habits and share good ones. In my experience, it can improve the quality of your research, add nuance to projects, and prompt new approaches to problems.

Nick Webber's STEAMhouse goals

To work with a range of people from across our target industries in order to better understand how our regional creative economy functions, and to offer research-informed support for the games industry.

The STEAMlabs challenge

How can advanced manufacturing increase engagement with arts and culture?

Nick Webber's essential items

Books. Cats. Tea.

A fact about Nick Webber

I can play the French Horn. I don’t (any more), but I can.

Nick Webber's ideal STEAMlabs delegate

Anyone with some skills and some good ideas, eager to listen to and work with others, and willing to share power.